$18 an Hour is How Much a Year? (Before and After Taxes)

Office space of people working on computers making $18 an hour.

You found out you will make $18 an hour. But $18 an hour is how much a year? Below you will find how much $18 an hour is annually, monthly, weekly, daily, and even after taxes. There’s also an example budget you can use when making $18 an hour.

To find out how much $18 an hour is as a yearly salary, multiply $18 by 40 hours and 52 weeks. So if you were to work full-time, 40 hours a week, making $18 an hour, you would earn $37,440 a year.

You might have just started making $18 an hour and are wondering if it’s enough to pay your bills. It’s a complicated question because a lot of it depends on your living situation.

For example, if you live in Michigan as a single adult with no kids, the living wage is $16.36 an hour. So if you’re making $18 an hour, you’re earning just over the living wage.

But that’s only if you’re single and don’t have kids. If you have a partner and only one of you works, the living wage is $25.26 (with no kids).

That’s $7.26 an hour more than your $18 wage. The living wage increases further with kids.

This is why we created a list of the best tools you need to start using when making $18 per hour. That list is included later on in this article.

To save your time and increase transparency around taxes, we also included precise estimates of what you could expect to pay in taxes for all 50 states at $37,440 per year ($18/hour).

This post may contain affiliate links. For more information, see our disclosure policy.

Comparison Table of $18 an Hour (Before & After Taxes)

$18 An HourPretax IncomeAfter-Tax Income
Yearly (52 Weeks)$37,440$28,080
Monthly (160 Hours)$2,880$2,160
Biweekly (80 Hours)$1,440$1,080
Weekly (40 Hours)$720$540
Daily (8 Hours)$144$108
Hourly (1 Hour)$18$13.5

$18 an Hour is How Much a Year?

If you make $18 an hour, your yearly salary would be $37,440. This is calculated by multiplying your $18 hourly wage by 2,080 total annual hours worked.

There’s a total of 52 weeks in the year, and if you work a full-time job, you will work on average 40 hours a week. So multiplying 40 hours by 52 weeks results in 2,080 total hours worked each year.

However, if you work fewer weeks or take some time off, you would earn less than this amount every year.

Find Out: $17 an Hour is How Much a Year?

$18 an Hour is How Much a Year After Taxes?

If you make $18 an hour, you would take home $28,080 a year after taxes. Your pre-tax salary was $37,440. But after paying 25% in taxes, your after-tax salary would be $28,080 a year.

The amount you pay in taxes depends on many different factors. But assuming a 25% to 30% tax rate is reasonable.

That means about a third to a fourth of your income will go to taxes at $18 an hour. There are ways to minimize how much you pay in taxes. However, for the average person, assuming this amount as a tax rate can be expected.

$18 an Hour is How Much a Month?

If you make $18 an hour, you would make $2,880 a month, assuming you are working full-time.

A full-time worker or employee works at least 40 hours a week. If you work either more or fewer hours, this amount will vary slightly.

Sometimes, if you work more than 40 hours a week, you might be eligible for overtime pay. Overtime pay is 1.5 times what you usually make. So you could end up making a considerable amount more than what is listed above.

Learn More: $16 an Hour is How Much a Year?

$18 an Hour is How Much Biweekly?

$18 an hour is $1,440 biweekly before taxes and approximately $1,080 after taxes. Paying a tax rate of 25% and working full-time at 40 hours a week, you would earn $1,080 after taxes.

To calculate how much you make biweekly before taxes, you would multiply $18 by 40 hours and 2 weeks.

$18 an Hour is How Much a Week?

If you make $18 an hour, you will get paid $720 a week. This amount is calculated by assuming you work full-time for all four weeks of the month. If you multiply 40 hours by $18 an hour, you get $720, your weekly income.

See: $15 an Hour is How Much a Year?

How Much is 18 dollars an Hour Daily?

$18 an hour is $144 per day. The standard workday is 8 hours. So by multiplying 8 hours by $18 an hour, you would earn $144 every day.

You can make $100 a day by working 5.56 hours at $18 an hour.

How Much is $18 an Hour Annually?

Annual and yearly income are two terms used a lot when talking about hourly wages and salaries. They essentially mean the same thing, just phrased slightly differently.

$18 an hour is $37,440 annually. This result is found by multiplying 18 x 40 x 52 to get the final annual amount. In the equation, the 18 stands for 18 dollars an hour, 40 means 40 hours a week, and 52 stands for 52 weeks in a year.

The formula used for finding your yearly income is the same one for calculating your annual income.

What is an $18 an Hour Salary?

Someone earning an $18 hourly wage earns a $37,440 yearly salary.

A typical full-time work week consists of 40 hours. Since there are 52 weeks in the year, you can multiply 18 dollars by 52 weeks and 40 hours to calculate your approximate annual salary.

At this income, you can expect to pay roughly 25% in taxes every year. So your after-tax salary will be just about $28,080.

Find Out: $14 an Hour is How Much a Year?

How Much is 18 dollars an Hour Annually Part-Time?

18 dollars annually part-time is between $18,720 and $32,760. If you work 20 hours per week for 52 weeks, you would earn $360 per week for a total of $18,720 per year.

On the other end of that spectrum, if you work 35 hours a week, which is still technically part-time, you would make $630 per week or $32,760 a year.

$18 an Hour Salary After Taxes in 2022 (By State)

Here is your estimated $18 an hour annual salary after taxes in 2022 for each state.

Just as a reminder, before taxes, your salary is $37,440. The after-tax amount will change based on your state taxes.

Alabama ( $30,270 )

Federal Income Tax ( 7.45% ) – $2,789

State Income Tax ( 4.05% ) – $1,516

FICA ( 7.65% ) – $2,864

Total Alabama Income Taxes ( 19.15% ) – $7,170

Annual Take-Home Pay in Alabama ( 80.85% ) – $30,270

Alaska ( $31,787 )

Federal Income Tax ( 7.45% ) – $2,789

State Income Tax ( 0.00% ) – $0

FICA ( 7.65% ) – $2,864

Total Alaska Income Taxes ( 15.10% ) – $5,653

Annual Take-Home Pay in Alaska ( 84.90% ) – $31,787

Arizona ( $31,142 )

Federal Income Tax ( 7.45% ) – $2,789

State Income Tax ( 1.72% ) – $645

FICA ( 7.65% ) – $2,864

Total Arizona Income Taxes ( 16.82% ) – $6,298

Annual Take-Home Pay in Arizona ( 83.18% ) – $31,142

Arkansas ( $30,633 )

Federal Income Tax ( 7.45% ) – $2,789

State Income Tax ( 3.08% ) – $1,154

FICA ( 7.65% ) – $2,864

Total Arkansas Income Taxes ( 18.18% ) – $6,807

Annual Take-Home Pay in Arkansas ( 81.82% ) – $30,633

California ( $31,016 )

Federal Income Tax ( 7.45% ) – $2,789

State Income Tax ( 2.06% ) – $770

FICA ( 7.65% ) – $2,864

Total California Income Taxes ( 17.16% ) – $6,424

Annual Take-Home Pay in California ( 82.84% ) – $31,016

Colorado ( $30,654 )

Federal Income Tax ( 7.45% ) – $2,789

State Income Tax ( 3.02% ) – $1,132

FICA ( 7.65% ) – $2,864

Total Colorado Income Taxes ( 18.12% ) – $6,786

Annual Take-Home Pay in Colorado ( 81.88% ) – $30,654

Connecticut ( $30,654 )

Federal Income Tax ( 7.45% ) – $2,789

State Income Tax ( 3.02% ) – $1,132

FICA ( 7.65% ) – $2,864

Total Connecticut Income Taxes ( 18.12% ) – $6,786

Annual Take-Home Pay in Connecticut ( 81.88% ) – $30,654

Delaware ( $30,276 )

Federal Income Tax ( 7.45% ) – $2,789

State Income Tax ( 4.04% ) – $1,511

FICA ( 7.65% ) – $2,864

Total Delaware Income Taxes ( 19.14% ) – $7,164

Annual Take-Home Pay in Delaware ( 80.86% ) – $30,276

Florida ( $31,787 )

Federal Income Tax ( 7.45% ) – $2,789

State Income Tax ( 0.00% ) – $0

FICA ( 7.65% ) – $2,864

Total Florida Income Taxes ( 15.10% ) – $5,653

Annual Take-Home Pay in Florida ( 84.90% ) – $31,787

Georgia ( $30,226 )

Federal Income Tax ( 7.45% ) – $2,789

State Income Tax ( 4.17% ) – $1,561

FICA ( 7.65% ) – $2,864

Total Georgia Income Taxes ( 19.27% ) – $7,214

Annual Take-Home Pay in Georgia ( 80.73% ) – $30,226

Hawaii ( $29,666 )

Federal Income Tax ( 7.45% ) – $2,789

State Income Tax ( 5.66% ) – $2,121

FICA ( 7.65% ) – $2,864

Total Hawaii Income Taxes ( 20.76% ) – $7,774

Annual Take-Home Pay in Hawaii ( 79.24% ) – $29,666

Idaho ( $30,415 )

Federal Income Tax ( 7.45% ) – $2,789

State Income Tax ( 3.66% ) – $1,372

FICA ( 7.65% ) – $2,864

Total Idaho Income Taxes ( 18.76% ) – $7,025

Annual Take-Home Pay in Idaho ( 81.24% ) – $30,415

Illinois ( $30,051 )

Federal Income Tax ( 7.45% ) – $2,789

State Income Tax ( 4.64% ) – $1,736

FICA ( 7.65% ) – $2,864

Total Illinois Income Taxes ( 19.74% ) – $7,389

Annual Take-Home Pay in Illinois ( 80.26% ) – $30,051

Indiana ( $30,610 )

Federal Income Tax ( 7.45% ) – $2,789

State Income Tax ( 3.14% ) – $1,177

FICA ( 7.65% ) – $2,864

Total Indiana Income Taxes ( 18.24% ) – $6,830

Annual Take-Home Pay in Indiana ( 81.76% ) – $30,610

Iowa ( $30,413 )

Federal Income Tax ( 7.45% ) – $2,789

State Income Tax ( 3.67% ) – $1,374

FICA ( 7.65% ) – $2,864

Total Iowa Income Taxes ( 18.77% ) – $7,027

Annual Take-Home Pay in Iowa ( 81.23% ) – $30,413

Kansas ( $30,409 )

Federal Income Tax ( 7.45% ) – $2,789

State Income Tax ( 3.68% ) – $1,377

FICA ( 7.65% ) – $2,864

Total Kansas Income Taxes ( 18.78% ) – $7,031

Annual Take-Home Pay in Kansas ( 81.22% ) – $30,409

More About Salaries: $30,000 a Year

Kentucky ( $30,049 )

Federal Income Tax ( 7.45% ) – $2,789

State Income Tax ( 4.64% ) – $1,738

FICA ( 7.65% ) – $2,864

Total Kentucky Income Taxes ( 19.74% ) – $7,391

Annual Take-Home Pay in Kentucky ( 80.26% ) – $30,049

Louisiana ( $30,869 )

Federal Income Tax ( 7.45% ) – $2,789

State Income Tax ( 2.45% ) – $917

FICA ( 7.65% ) – $2,864

Total Louisiana Income Taxes ( 17.55% ) – $6,571

Annual Take-Home Pay in Louisiana ( 82.45% ) – $30,869

Maine ( $30,592 )

Federal Income Tax ( 7.45% ) – $2,789

State Income Tax ( 3.19% ) – $1,194

FICA ( 7.65% ) – $2,864

Total Maine Income Taxes ( 18.29% ) – $6,848

Annual Take-Home Pay in Maine ( 81.71% ) – $30,592

Maryland ( $30,461 )

Federal Income Tax ( 7.45% ) – $2,789

State Income Tax ( 3.54% ) – $1,325

FICA ( 7.65% ) – $2,864

Total Maryland Income Taxes ( 18.64% ) – $6,979

Annual Take-Home Pay in Maryland ( 81.36% ) – $30,461

Massachusetts ( $30,135 )

Federal Income Tax ( 7.45% ) – $2,789

State Income Tax ( 4.41% ) – $1,652

FICA ( 7.65% ) – $2,864

Total Massachusetts Income Taxes ( 19.51% ) – $7,305

Annual Take-Home Pay in Massachusetts ( 80.49% ) – $30,135

Michigan ( $30,404 )

Federal Income Tax ( 7.45% ) – $2,789

State Income Tax ( 3.69% ) – $1,383

FICA ( 7.65% ) – $2,864

Total Michigan Income Taxes ( 18.79% ) – $7,036

Annual Take-Home Pay in Michigan ( 81.21% ) – $30,404

Minnesota ( $30,454 )

Federal Income Tax ( 7.45% ) – $2,789

State Income Tax ( 3.56% ) – $1,333

FICA ( 7.65% ) – $2,864

Total Minnesota Income Taxes ( 18.66% ) – $6,986

Annual Take-Home Pay in Minnesota ( 81.34% ) – $30,454

Mississippi ( $30,570 )

Federal Income Tax ( 7.45% ) – $2,789

State Income Tax ( 3.25% ) – $1,217

FICA ( 7.65% ) – $2,864

Total Mississippi Income Taxes ( 18.35% ) – $6,870

Annual Take-Home Pay in Mississippi ( 81.65% ) – $30,570

Missouri ( $30,783 )

Federal Income Tax ( 7.45% ) – $2,789

State Income Tax ( 2.68% ) – $1,003

FICA ( 7.65% ) – $2,864

Total Missouri Income Taxes ( 17.78% ) – $6,657

Annual Take-Home Pay in Missouri ( 82.22% ) – $30,783

Montana ( $30,454 )

Federal Income Tax ( 7.45% ) – $2,789

State Income Tax ( 3.56% ) – $1,333

FICA ( 7.65% ) – $2,864

Total Montana Income Taxes ( 18.66% ) – $6,986

Annual Take-Home Pay in Montana ( 81.34% ) – $30,454

Nebraska ( $30,602 )

Federal Income Tax ( 7.45% ) – $2,789

State Income Tax ( 3.16% ) – $1,184

FICA ( 7.65% ) – $2,864

Total Nebraska Income Taxes ( 18.26% ) – $6,838

Annual Take-Home Pay in Nebraska ( 81.74% ) – $30,602

Nevada ( $31,787 )

Federal Income Tax ( 7.45% ) – $2,789

State Income Tax ( 0.00% ) – $0

FICA ( 7.65% ) – $2,864

Total Nevada Income Taxes ( 15.10% ) – $5,653

Annual Take-Home Pay in Nevada ( 84.90% ) – $31,787

New Hampshire ( $31,787 )

Federal Income Tax ( 7.45% ) – $2,789

State Income Tax ( 0.00% ) – $0

FICA ( 7.65% ) – $2,864

Total New Hampshire Income Taxes ( 15.10% ) – $5,653

Annual Take-Home Pay in New Hampshire ( 84.90% ) – $31,787

New Jersey ( $31,194 )

Federal Income Tax ( 7.45% ) – $2,789

State Income Tax ( 1.58% ) – $593

FICA ( 7.65% ) – $2,864

Total New Jersey Income Taxes ( 16.68% ) – $6,246

Annual Take-Home Pay in New Jersey ( 83.32% ) – $31,194

New Mexico ( $30,846 )

Federal Income Tax ( 7.45% ) – $2,789

State Income Tax ( 2.51% ) – $940

FICA ( 7.65% ) – $2,864

Total New Mexico Income Taxes ( 17.61% ) – $6,594

Annual Take-Home Pay in New Mexico ( 82.39% ) – $30,846

New York ( $30,278 )

Federal Income Tax ( 7.45% ) – $2,789

State Income Tax ( 4.03% ) – $1,509

FICA ( 7.65% ) – $2,864

Total New York Income Taxes ( 19.13% ) – $7,162

Annual Take-Home Pay in New York ( 80.87% ) – $30,278

Check Out This Annual Salary: $15,000 a Year

North Carolina ( $30,385 )

Federal Income Tax ( 7.45% ) – $2,789

State Income Tax ( 3.74% ) – $1,401

FICA ( 7.65% ) – $2,864

Total North Carolina Income Taxes ( 18.84% ) – $7,055

Annual Take-Home Pay in North Carolina ( 81.16% ) – $30,385

North Dakota ( $31,513 )

Federal Income Tax ( 7.45% ) – $2,789

State Income Tax ( 0.73% ) – $274

FICA ( 7.65% ) – $2,864

Total North Dakota Income Taxes ( 15.83% ) – $5,927

Annual Take-Home Pay in North Dakota ( 84.17% ) – $31,513

Ohio ( $31,494 )

Federal Income Tax ( 7.45% ) – $2,789

State Income Tax ( 0.78% ) – $293

FICA ( 7.65% ) – $2,864

Total Ohio Income Taxes ( 15.88% ) – $5,946

Annual Take-Home Pay in Ohio ( 84.12% ) – $31,494

Oklahoma ( $30,471 )

Federal Income Tax ( 7.45% ) – $2,789

State Income Tax ( 3.51% ) – $1,316

FICA ( 7.65% ) – $2,864

Total Oklahoma Income Taxes ( 18.61% ) – $6,969

Annual Take-Home Pay in Oklahoma ( 81.39% ) – $30,471

Oregon ( $29,012 )

Federal Income Tax ( 7.45% ) – $2,789

State Income Tax ( 7.41% ) – $2,774

FICA ( 7.65% ) – $2,864

Total Oregon Income Taxes ( 22.51% ) – $8,428

Annual Take-Home Pay in Oregon ( 77.49% ) – $29,012

Pennsylvania ( $30,637 )

Federal Income Tax ( 7.45% ) – $2,789

State Income Tax ( 3.07% ) – $1,149

FICA ( 7.65% ) – $2,864

Total Pennsylvania Income Taxes ( 18.17% ) – $6,803

Annual Take-Home Pay in Pennsylvania ( 81.83% ) – $30,637

Rhode Island ( $30,889 )

Federal Income Tax ( 7.45% ) – $2,789

State Income Tax ( 2.40% ) – $898

FICA ( 7.65% ) – $2,864

Total Rhode Island Income Taxes ( 17.50% ) – $6,551

Annual Take-Home Pay in Rhode Island ( 82.50% ) – $30,889

South Carolina ( $30,589 )

Federal Income Tax ( 7.45% ) – $2,789

State Income Tax ( 3.20% ) – $1,197

FICA ( 7.65% ) – $2,864

Total South Carolina Income Taxes ( 18.30% ) – $6,851

Annual Take-Home Pay in South Carolina ( 81.70% ) – $30,589

South Dakota ( $31,787 )

Federal Income Tax ( 7.45% ) – $2,789

State Income Tax ( 0.00% ) – $0

FICA ( 7.65% ) – $2,864

Total South Dakota Income Taxes ( 15.10% ) – $5,653

Annual Take-Home Pay in South Dakota ( 84.90% ) – $31,787

Tennessee ( $31,787 )

Federal Income Tax ( 7.45% ) – $2,789

State Income Tax ( 0.00% ) – $0

FICA ( 7.65% ) – $2,864

Total Tennessee Income Taxes ( 15.10% ) – $5,653

Annual Take-Home Pay in Tennessee ( 84.90% ) – $31,787

Texas ( $31,787 )

Federal Income Tax ( 7.45% ) – $2,789

State Income Tax ( 0.00% ) – $0

FICA ( 7.65% ) – $2,864

Total Texas Income Taxes ( 15.10% ) – $5,653

Annual Take-Home Pay in Texas ( 84.90% ) – $31,787

Utah ( $29,933 )

Federal Income Tax ( 7.45% ) – $2,789

State Income Tax ( 4.95% ) – $1,853

FICA ( 7.65% ) – $2,864

Total Utah Income Taxes ( 20.05% ) – $7,507

Annual Take-Home Pay in Utah ( 79.95% ) – $29,933

Vermont ( $30,887 )

Federal Income Tax ( 7.45% ) – $2,789

State Income Tax ( 2.40% ) – $899

FICA ( 7.65% ) – $2,864

Total Vermont Income Taxes ( 17.50% ) – $6,553

Annual Take-Home Pay in Vermont ( 82.50% ) – $30,887

Virginia ( $30,203 )

Federal Income Tax ( 7.45% ) – $2,789

State Income Tax ( 4.23% ) – $1,583

FICA ( 7.65% ) – $2,864

Total Virginia Income Taxes ( 19.33% ) – $7,237

Annual Take-Home Pay in Virginia ( 80.67% ) – $30,203

Washington ( $31,787 )

Federal Income Tax ( 7.45% ) – $2,789

State Income Tax ( 0.00% ) – $0

FICA ( 7.65% ) – $2,864

Total Washington Income Taxes ( 15.10% ) – $5,653

Annual Take-Home Pay in Washington ( 84.90% ) – $31,787

West Virginia ( $30,417 )

Federal Income Tax ( 7.45% ) – $2,789

State Income Tax ( 3.66% ) – $1,370

FICA ( 7.65% ) – $2,864

Total West Virginia Income Taxes ( 18.76% ) – $7,023

Annual Take-Home Pay in West Virginia ( 81.24% ) – $30,417

Wisconsin ( $30,540 )

Federal Income Tax ( 7.45% ) – $2,789

State Income Tax ( 3.33% ) – $1,247

FICA ( 7.65% ) – $2,864

Total Wisconsin Income Taxes ( 18.43% ) – $6,900

Annual Take-Home Pay in Wisconsin ( 81.57% ) – $30,540

Wyoming ( $31,787 )

Federal Income Tax ( 7.45% ) – $2,789

State Income Tax ( 0.00% ) – $0

FICA ( 7.65% ) – $2,864

Total Wyoming Income Taxes ( 15.10% ) – $5,653

Annual Take-Home Pay in Wyoming ( 84.90% ) – $31,787

Tools You Need to Live on $18 an Hour

Earning $18 an hour is quite an accomplishment. Learning how to save, invest and make more is even better.

There’s no such thing as being too financially prepared. But the truth is many hear “personal finance” and think it is much more complicated than it actually is.

The reality of the situation is that there are plenty of tools that simplify personal finance. These tools simplify personal finance to the point where anyone can start today and become better off financially than the previous day.

Whether you are a complete beginner or you are a personal finance pro, this remains true. Below you will find the tools you need to live on $18 an hour.

CIT Bank

Everything is online nowadays, and this includes banking. A reliable and trustworthy bank is something you need, no matter your financial situation. When it comes to reliable banking, you cannot go wrong with CIT Bank.

They are an FDIC-insured Bank that operates entirely online. The days of needing to go to your local bank’s branch are over. When you bank with CIT Bank, you will save both time and money.

Start building up your savings the right way with a CIT Bank account. Enjoy no monthly fees for checking and savings accounts, as well as great rates with their money market and high-yield savings accounts.

Survey Junkie

Everyone likes earning a bit of extra cash. Well, with Survey Junkie, you get paid to share your opinions on products and services. It can’t get much easier than that. Anytime you have a few minutes to spare, fill out one of their surveys and make some money. Sign up today and start taking surveys to receive gift cards or PayPal money.

FreshBooks

There can be quite a bit of a learning curve for anyone trying to learn how to manage money. However, with FreshBooks, you won’t have to worry about learning some complicated software. Whether you own a business or are looking to do personal accounting, FreshBooks accounting software will save you a ton of time and money.

No longer do you need to hire an expensive accountant to do your accounting. Instead, FreshBooks offers a solution with its easy-to-use, affordable accounting software. Not only that, you can access it across all your devices, including your phone, tablet, or computer.

They are perfect for beginners and even offer a free trial. Start using FreshBooks today to simplify your accounting with their affordable accounting software.

Is $18 an Hour Good Money?

If you make $18 an hour, you are making a good amount of money. Anyone earning an hourly wage is paid based on the number of hours worked. So the more hours worked, the larger the paycheck.

For example, say you only decided to work a couple of shifts and ended up working a total of 10 hours in a week. Working 10 hours a week, you would earn $180.

Compare that to if you worked twice that many hours, for a total of 20 hours. If you work 20 hours a week, you would end up making $360.

Perhaps you are currently only working part-time for a total of 25 weekly hours. Working 25 hours a week, you would earn $450.

But if you work 30 hours a week, you would make $540.

And lastly, if you work full-time at 40 hours a week, you would earn $720.

The amount of hours you work at 18 dollars an hour dictates whether or not it’s good money. If you only work a few hours a week at this hourly pay, it might not be a whole lot of money. Someone earning less but working more hours could end up making more than you.

But if you work part-time or full-time at 18 dollars an hour, you will get paid a good amount of money.

Learn More: $13 an Hour is How Much a Year?

How To Budget $18 an Hour

Creating a monthly budget for how much you need to spend, save, and invest is not as difficult as it seems. First, you will need to find your after-tax income, otherwise known as your take-home pay. Your take-home pay for $18 an hour or $37,440 a year is approximately $2,160 a month.

You then will need to split that $2,160 after-tax income into different categories. These categories represent your expenses, savings, and investments. If you make $37,440 a year, this is an example of what your monthly budget can look like:

CategoryBudget AmountPercentage
Housing$64830%
Saving and Investing$32415%
Insurance$32415%
Food$21610%
Transportation$21610%
Entertainment and Recreation$21610%
Personal Expenses$1085%
Utilities$1085%
Total$2,160100%

Is $18 an Hour Good Pay?

Making 18 dollars an hour is good pay. The more hours you work, the more money you will end up making at this hourly rate.

For example, say you get paid every two weeks. If you work part-time, 18 dollars an hour, 20 hours a week, you would earn $720 before taxes.

If you work full-time, every two weeks you would make $1,440 before taxes. After taxes, you would make approximately $1,080.

Look: $17 an Hour is How Much a Year?

How Much is $18 an Hour After Taxes?

$18 an hour before taxes is equal to $13.5 an hour after taxes. By deducting a 25% tax rate from the $18 hourly rate, you will find your after-tax hourly rate is $4.5 less than your pre-tax rate.

You will make 18 dollars an hour before taxes. But after taxes, you will only get to take home $13.5 for every $18 made.

Now that you know this is the case, you can take that after-tax hourly pay number and multiply it by the number of hours you worked to calculate your after-tax pay.

Say, for example, you worked 30 hours at your job one week. You would take your after-tax hourly wage of $13.5 and multiply it by 30 hours to get your pay for that week. After multiplying those two numbers together, you would get an after-tax weekly income of $405.

Taxes will fluctuate depending on the individual, where you live, etc. So this figure might change.

Conclusion

For a quick recap on how much $18 an hour is. Here is how you can figure out how much $18 an hour is annually, monthly, biweekly, weekly, and daily.

When finding out how much $18 an hour is per year, you take $18 and multiply it by 40 hours and 52 weeks.

When calculating 18 dollars an hour monthly, you take $18 multiplied by 40 hours and 4 weeks.

To find out how much $18 per hour biweekly is, take $18 multiplied by 40 hours and 2 weeks.

For weekly, you take $18 multiplied by 40 hours. We multiply it by 40 hours because 40 hours a week is considered full-time.

And lastly, to calculate how much $18 an hour is daily, you take $18 and multiply it by 8 hours. Eight hours is used in this calculation because that amount of time represents the standard workday.

If you enjoyed reading about how much $18 an hour is, check out our other hourly wage articles below!

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